Scope

Scope

 1.1 A "Lincoln document" is

  • a document written in Abraham Lincoln's hand;
  • a document printed from an original written in Abraham Lincoln's hand (e.g., letters authored by Lincoln to a newspaper);
  • a document written by a clerk or assistant but signed by Abraham Lincoln or issued directly under his authority;
  • a document reporting Abraham Lincoln's words (e.g., legislative bills and acts, newspaper reports of speeches);
  • a document addressed or directed to Abraham Lincoln (either sender's or recipient's copy; either draft or final version);
  • a document enclosed with correspondence addressed to Abraham Lincoln or written by Lincoln; or
  • a document comprising a part of the official record of a particular matter submitted for Abraham Lincoln's review.

Letters by Secretaries

1.2 Letters written by Lincoln's secretaries, and signed by the secretary, are in the scope of this project, if the letter contains language such as, "the president directs me to..." (originally decided as out of scope, 11/18/05; decision reversed, 11/05/09)

Letters written by Lincoln's secretaries who signed Lincoln's name, are within the scope of this project. (11/18/05)

Speeches and Remarks

1.3 All of Lincoln's public remarks and speeches are within the scope of this project. They are titled differently, depending upon the documentation. (11/18/05, updated 12/08/05; updated 2/8/08)

- "Speeches"are those versions that the orator had a hand in, such as Lincoln's annual message to congress, the Cooper Union Address, and the version of the Lincoln and Douglas debates that Lincoln edited. Some may have a title of "Address" or "Annual Message," and you should follow historical nomenclature there (e.g., "First Inaugural Address," not "First Inaugural Speech") The doctype, however, is "speech."- Those speeches published or recorded so as to be considered close to verbatim, without the orator having a hand in, are named "Report of Speech." The Lincoln and Douglas debates, for example, published in the various newspapers, which Lincoln did not edit, are named "Report of Speech to ....(or Debate)." The doctype is "speech"

- Those speeches published or recorded which are paraphrased, excerpted, or summarized, are named "Summary of Speech to ...." The doctype is "speech."

- "Remarks" are more spontaneous than prepared and typically are in response to a serenade or to a visitor’s comments. These documents can also take the form of "Report of Remarks to ...." or "Summary of Remarks to ...." depending on the documentation. The doctype for all is "remarks."

Often, Lincoln remarks come in reply to a formal communication by a diplomat, official, etc. When the speech to Lincoln is also reported or summarized, create a new document for it with an appropriate title that includes the name of the speaker, e.g., "Report of Speech of John Conness to Abraham Lincoln." The doctype is "speech" or "remarks" as appropriate.

Private reminiscences of Lincoln’s remarks such as diaries and letters to others are not within the project’s scope. Also excluded from the scope are private remarks which are published contemporaneously unless they are in Collected Works. If they are in Collected Works, they fall within our scope. The reception of diplomats and domestic delegations should be considered public rather than private for the purposes of this rule. (11/18/05; revised 01/18/08)

Pamphlet or Printed Copies of Documents

1.4 Pamphlet or printed copies of documents addressed to Lincoln or from Lincoln are within our scope. If the manuscript form of these documents is already in Pubman, the published form is a "b" record.. (2/00/06)

Telegrams transmitting Orders

1.5 Documents such as telegrams transmitting executive orders or general orders are not in scope because the order being transmitted is not a unique enclosure. (5/18/06)

Inscriptions

1.6 Inscriptions from Lincoln to another person or from another person to Lincoln in books, in autograph albums, or on pictures are in scope if they contain more words, either printed or handwritten, than just Lincoln’s name. Lincoln’s handwriting in a book of his own does not constitute an inscription.

For books with an inscription, both the page containing the inscription and the title page of the book are in scope and will be transcribed. For autograph books, the entire page with Lincoln’s autograph is in scope and will be transcribed.

For undated inscriptions in Political Debates between Hon. Abraham Lincoln and Hon. Stephen A. Douglas, the inferred date will be a range of 1860-XX-XX to 1865-XX-XX. If the inscription has a date, use that date.

Legislative Documents

1.7 Legislative Documents include Acts, Bills, Drafts of Bills, Amendments to Bills, Petitions, Reports of Proceedings, Resolutions, and Reports to and from the respective legislative body.

In all cases, the date of the document will match the sortkey, even though multiple texts of a single document may not be contiguous in PubMan.

Acts

1.7.1 All Acts passed by the legislature or Congress during Lincoln’s terms are in scope, whether he voted for or against or whether he voted at all. The Acts will take the date of Approval, as published in the Statutes.

Bills

1.7.2 All final Bills on which the House of Representatives voted are in scope and most will be b’s of the above Acts. Bills will take the date on the face of the Bill, or if there is no date, the date on which the House voted on the Bill.

Drafts of Bills

1.7.3 Drafts of Bills are in scope if they meet one or more of the following criteria:

  • Bills written in whole or in part by Abraham Lincoln;
  • Bills to which Lincoln proposed an amendment;
  • Bills coming from committees of which Lincoln was a member

Drafts of Bills will be b’s or c’s of final Bills or Acts. They will take the date on the face of the draft or the date on which the committee considered the draft if that date can be ascertained.

Amendments to Bills

1.7.4 Amendments to Bills are in scope if they meet one or more of the following criteria:

  • Amendments to Bills written in whole or in part by Abraham Lincoln;
  • Amendments proposed by Abraham Lincoln;
  • Amendments proposed to Bills to which Lincoln also proposed an Amendment;
  • Amendments to Bills coming from committees of which Lincoln was a member.

Amendments to Bills do not have to have passed to be in scope. Amendments to Bills will have unique DocumentIDs and will be linked as Related Documents to the Bills and Acts to which they pertain. They will take the date on the face of the amendment or the date on which the committee considered the amendment if that date can be ascertained.

For House Bills with Senate amendments, we will scan the engrossed HR text as the "a" and the engrossed HR text plus the Senate amendments as the "b", as the HR would have had to vote on whatever the Senate returned to it. (4/23/2010)

For Senate Bills with House amendments, we will scan the engrossed Senate text as the "a" and the engrossed Senate text plus the HR amendments as the "b". (4/23/2010)

For Bills with multiple amendments, we will scan each amendment separately with separate Pubman numbers and with links to related documents. (4/23/2010)

Petitions

1.7.5 Petitions are in scope if they meet one or more of the following criteria:

  • Petitions addressed to Abraham Lincoln;
  • Petitions addressed to a committee of which Lincoln was a member;
  • Petitions referred by Abraham Lincoln to a committee;
  • Petitions referred to a committee of which Lincoln was a member;
  • Petitions referred to the Committee of the Whole. (4/23/2010)

Petitions addressed to the House, the General Assemby, or Congress in general are not in scope unless they meet the above criteria. (4/23/2010)

Petitions addressed to Congress as a whole but referred to committees other than ones on which Lincoln served are not in scope. Exception: if a petition comes to the legislature or Congress, is referred to a committee on which Lincoln does not serve, but Lincoln writes or amends the bill, the petition would be part of the "sausage" of the bill, and would be in scope (the drafting and amending exception). (4/23/2010)

Petitions will have unique DocumentIDs and will be linked as Related Documents to the Bills and Acts to which they pertain. Petitions will take the date on the face of the document.

House Journals

1.7.6 House Journals may be in scope, pending further investigation. If they are in scope, they will be titled "Proceedings of the Illinois House of Representatives" or "Proceedings of the United States House of Representatives," and each day will be a single document. The doctype will be "proceedings".

Reports of Proceedings

1.7.7 Reports of the proceedings in the newspaper or in the Congressional Globe may be in scope, pending further investigation. If they are in scope, they will be b’s of the House Journal documents, and each day will be a single document. The doctype will be "proceedings".

Resolutions

1.7.8 Resolutions are in scope if they meet the following criteria:

  • Resolutions passed by the legislature or Congress during Lincoln’s terms, whether he voted for or against or whether he voted at all;
  • Resolutions directed to external entities (the Governor in Illinois; executive departments in the U.S.) asking/demanding reports or answers to queries;
  • Resolutions directed inside the chamber to committees on which Lincoln served;
  • Internal resolutions directing committees to investigate issues or issue reports are out of scope, except in the case of Lincoln committees. (4/30/2010)

Reports

1.7.9 Reports addressed to the legislature from government officials or departments or other external entities are in scope. Exception: Messages from the President or Governor announcing the signing or passage of bills are not in scope. Internal reports circulating with the legislature are not in scope. (4/30/2010)

1.8 Financial Records

All of Lincoln's financial records are within the scope of this project. They are titled differently, depending upon the documentation. (02/17/2010)

1.9 Pressbook Copies (9/4/2008)

Pressbook Copies are mechanical reproductions of correspondence retained by the sender.

In some circumstances, the pressbook copy version of a letter will be all that we find. In those cases, treat the pressbook copy as any other document, with the exception that the MSType will be "Pressbook Copy."

In cases where we locate both the original letter and the pressbook copy, compare the two images.

If we encounter a pressbook copy after having located the original letter, add a second <bibl> to <AccessionInfo> to indicate the presence of a pressbook copy at a different repository. Include the <MSType>, <extent>, and other bibliographic information, including a link to the repository.

Do not include an image link or make a derivative image of the pressbook copy.

Do keep the master TIFF image file in the repository directory at NCSA.

Exception: If the pressbook copy has any subsequent substantive notations or if it is more complete than the sent letter (e.g., the sent letter is missing a page), include it as a "b" of the original letter.

If we encounter an original, sent letter after having located the pressbook copy, add a new <bibl> to <AccessionInfo> before the pressbook copy <bibl>. Include the <MSType>, <extent>, bibliographic information, and link to the repository in the new <bibl>. The new image link will be created when the image is processed. Do not create a separate "b" record.

Delete the image link for the pressbook copy in the pressbook copy <bibl>.

Ask Stacy or Daniel to delete the image record for the pressbook copy in PubMan.

Ask Stacy to delete the derivative image for the pressbook copy at NCSA.

If there is already a transcription from the pressbook copy, check the transcription for accuracy against the sent letter and add any endorsements that may have been added to the sent letter.

1.10 Multiple Versions of Printed Documents (b, c, d, e, etc.)

There should be no artificial cap on the number of versions of a document in Pubman. ( 4/13/2010)

If a researcher finds a handwritten version of a document that already has a record in Pubman in printed form, put it on the spreadsheet and in Pubman with the appropriate number/letter and scan the document. The manuscript type would be "handwritten transcription." (4/13/2010)

If a researcher finds a printed version of a document that already has a record in Pubman in printed form, put it on the spreadsheet as DocumentID number with "x" suffix and add an additional <bibl> reference to the existing record in Pubman but do not scan the document. The manuscript type would be "printed document signed with a representation." (4/13/2010)

If a researcher finds a printed version of a document that already has a record in Pubman in printed form but with different/unique docketing or endorsements, put it on the spreadsheet and in Pubman with the appropriate number/letter and scan the document. The manuscript type would be "printed document signed with a representation." (4/13/2010)

The first text of any Printed Document---petition, order, proclamation, etc.---will be processed like any normal in-scope document. (7/29/2010)

Subsequent texts that have no writing on them will be included on the spreadsheet with the DocumentID of the first text followed by an "x" suffix. They do not get a separate PubMan record. They do get a <bibl> entry in the record of the first-located text, indicating where they are. Texts with an "x" suffix do not count in document totals for the series in which they are located. (7/29/2010)

Subsequent texts of any Printed Document that have substantive endorsements on them should be treated as additional texts of the first text and should get a "b," "c," "d," etc. suffix and a record in PubMan. (7/29/2010)

In distinguishing between a text of a Printed Document that gets a "b," "c," "d," record, and a text that gets an "x" suffix, consider the nature of any handwriting on the Printed Document. If the difference between the text under consideration and the first text is simply the numbering of a file system or the name of a person, give the text an "x" suffix. If there is a substantive endorsement, additional directions added to the document, etc., treat it as an additional text and give it a "b," "c," "d," suffix and a PubMan record. (7/29/2010)

Use double letters when you get to the end of the alphabet. However, please skip "x" as a suffix. Therefore, "w," "y," "z," "aa," "bb," etc. (7/29/2010; 8/17/2010)

Applying these rules is a judgment call. Think about potential researchers. Would they need to know only where mulitple texts of the same Printed Document are located, or would they need to see the text before you because of its unique nature? (7/29/2010)

The goal is to avoid the transcription of dozens of copies of printed texts with no significant variation. (7/29/2010)

These rules do not apply to Handwritten Transcriptions of orders, proclamations, etc. They are treated as "b," "c," "d," texts because they are handwritten and not mechanical copies. (7/29/2010)

1.11 Multiple Versions of Printed Treaties

For the first copy of a printed text, there should be a normal <bibl>, and the spreadsheet will have a normal entry.(9/8/2010)

It is ESSENTIAL that the <bibl> for the text that we scanned be first in the list under <AccessionInfo> because when Stephen Perkins adds links in a batch, he attaches the image link to the first <bibl>.(9/8/2010)

For subsequent copies of a printed text, put the <MSType>, the <extent>, and the link to the appropriate source. If there are specific Boxes that you captured on the spreadsheet, it is OK to put that information in as well. On the spreadsheets, these texts should be indicated with an "x" suffix. Make certain that any spreadsheets that have duplicate "x" texts have the number filled in with the "x" suffix. Otherwise, they will be put into PubMan as new documents.(9/8/2010)

Put the additional <bibl>s for "x" texts only in the record that is the printed copy. For example, if you have a handwritten text as the "a", a handwritten transcription as a "b", and the printed text as a "c", put the additional <bibl>s for other printed texts only in the "c" record.(9/8/2010)

1.12 Register Entries

Register entries are in the scope of the project when they contain a synopsis of the contents of correspondence for which the project has not located the original.  Some registers record only the author and the date, and perhaps the recipient, of correspondence.  Such entries are not within the scope of the project.  However, if the register entry contains some mention of the contents of the letter or other correspondence which it records, or a partial transcription, it should be included.  The document name will be the same as the document it describes (e.g., “Abraham Lincoln to Richard Yates”), but the docClass will be “register entry,” and the manuscript type should usually be Handwritten Document, as it describes the register entry itself, not the original document.

If the project subsequently locates the actual document to which the register entry refers, replace the register entry with the actual document in the original record.  Do not create a “b” record for the actual document. (9/11/2010).

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