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Charles W. Nabb to Abraham Lincoln, 30 April 18491
Abraham Lincoln Esqr[Esquire]Sir.
from solicitation of friends, at home and abroad I have concluded to make application for the office of Marshall for the District of Illinois: having been acquainted with the business of sheriff I am purswaded that I could discharge the business of Marshall of the State: the appointment would be thankfully received & your influence in that case would be of great benefit. I shall forward Several letters to Mr Ewing upon the subject; your exertion in my behalf in this case will never be forgotten, & do hope it will meet with your entire aprobation; I know I have a strong competitor Mr B. Bond but you will find when you come to talk with the good old Zack that he has known me from my youth. I must quit
Yours RespectfullyCharles W Nabb2
1Charles W. Nabb wrote and signed this letter.
2Nabb would not get Abraham Lincoln’s endorsement or the appointment as U.S. marshal; in March 1849, Lincoln wrote several letters soliciting government officials on Benjamin Bond’s behalf, though he preferred that the appointment go to Charles G. Thomas. Bond received the appointment and held the job until 1853.
Abraham Lincoln to John M. Clayton; Memorandum concerning Benjamin Bond; Abraham Lincoln to John M. Clayton; Abraham Lincoln to John M. Clayton; Register of all Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1849 (Washington, DC: Gideon, 1849), 247; Register of all Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1851 (Washington, DC: Gideon, 1851), 267; Register of Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1853 (Washington, DC: Robert Armstrong, 1853), 259.

Autograph Letter Signed, 1 page(s), Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress (Washington, DC), .