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Estep, Enoch

Born: 1790-1800 North Carolina

Flourished: 1834 Menard County, Illinois

In 1821, Estep arrived in Sangamon County, Illinois, settling in an region northeast of what would become Petersburg, Illinois, an area that would later be subsumed into Menard County. In 1822, he married Nancy Sears. In the mid-1830s, he purchased tracts of land in the portion of Sangamon County that would become part of Mason County. Twice, Abraham Lincoln was counsel for the opposing party in a case involving Estep. Around 1841, Estep moved away from the area, possibly to Arkansas or Jasper County, Missouri.

U.S. Census Office, Fifth Census of the United States (1830), Sangamon County, IL, 196; Robert D. Miller, Past and Present of Menard County, Illinois (Chicago: S. J. Clarke, 1905), 88; The History of Menard and Mason Counties, Illinois (Chicago: O. L. Baskin, 1879), 284, 661; Illinois Public Domain Land Tract Sales Database, Menard County, 68:177, Mason County, 68:168, 264, 69: 80, 140, Illinois State Archives, Springfield, IL; Illinois Statewide Marriage Index, Sangamon County, 10 July 1822, Illinois State Archives, Springfield, IL; Estep v. Wagoner et al., Martha L. Benner and Cullom Davis et al., eds., The Law Practice of Abraham Lincoln: Complete Documentary Edition, 2d edition (Springfield: Illinois Historic Preservation Agency, 2009), http://www.lawpracticeofabrahamlincoln.org/Details.aspx?case=135793; Wagoner & Wagoner v. Wagon et al., Martha L. Benner and Cullom Davis et al., eds., The Law Practice of Abraham Lincoln: Complete Documentary Edition, http://www.lawpracticeofabrahamlincoln.org/Details.aspx?case=135307 .