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Abraham Lincoln to James S. Irwin, 2 November 18421
Jas S. Irwin Esqr[Esquire]
Owing to my absence, yours of the 22nd ult. was not received till this moment–2
Judge Logan & myself are willing to attend to any business in the Supreme Court you may send us–3 As to fees, it is impossible to establish a rule that will apply in all, or even a great many cases– We belive we are never accused of being very unreasonable in this particular; and we would always be easily satisfied, provided we could see the money– but whatever fees we earn at a distance, if not paid before, we have noticed, we never hear of after the work is done– We therefore, are growing a little sensitive on that point–
Yours &c.[etc.]A. Lincoln
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[10?]
SPRINGFIELD [Il.[Illinois]]
NOV[November] 4
James S. Irwin EsqrMount SterlingIllinois
[endorsement]
Springfield
Springfield
Springfield
Springfield
James S Irwin
James S Irwin
James S Irwin
James S Irwin
James S Irwin
James S Irwin
1842
1842
1842
1842 James S. Irwin

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[docketing]
Abram. Lincoln
1Abraham Lincoln wrote and signed the letter. He also wrote the address on the back page, which was folded to create an envelope for mailing.
2Irwin’s October 22, 1842 letter to Lincoln has not been located. Lincoln had been attending to legal cases on the circuit; he was in Danville attending the Vermilion County Circuit Court from at least October 17 to 19, and he was in Charleston at the Coles County Circuit Court on October 25 and 29 (and likely the intervening days, as well).
Wilson v. Frazier, Martha L. Benner and Cullom Davis et al., eds., The Law Practice of Abraham Lincoln: Complete Documentary Edition, 2d edition (Springfield: Illinois Historic Preservation Agency, 2009), http://www.lawpracticeofabrahamlincoln.org/Details.aspx?case=137445; Turney v. Craig, Martha L. Benner and Cullom Davis et al., eds., The Law Practice of Abraham Lincoln: Complete Documentary Edition, http://www.lawpracticeofabrahamlincoln.org/Details.aspx?case=135692; Pearson & Anderson v. Monroe & Eastin, Martha L. Benner and Cullom Davis et al., eds., The Law Practice of Abraham Lincoln: Complete Documentary Edition, http://www.lawpracticeofabrahamlincoln.org/Details.aspx?case=135718; The Lincoln Log: A Daily Chronology of the Life of Abraham Lincoln, 17 October 1842, http://thelincolnlog.org/Results.aspx?type=CalendarDay&day=1842-10-17; 18 October 1842, http://thelincolnlog.org/Results.aspx?type=CalendarDay&day=1842-10-18; 19 October 1842, http://thelincolnlog.org/Results.aspx?type=CalendarDay&day=1842-10-19; 25 October 1842, http://thelincolnlog.org/Results.aspx?type=CalendarDay&day=1842-10-25; 29 October 1842, http://thelincolnlog.org/Results.aspx?type=CalendarDay&day=1842-10-29.
3Logan & Lincoln handled at least one appeal to the Illinois Supreme Court on behalf of Irwin, a fellow lawyer from western Illinois. In April 1842, Irwin had represented Henry Cheseldine in a debt case in Brown County. The defendants, Greenleaf C. Robinson and Thomas L. Adams, appealed the case to the Illinois Supreme Court. Logan & Lincoln represented Cheseldine in the appeal, which ran from December 1842 to December 1844. This may be the case about which Irwin was asking Lincoln.
Robinson v. Cheseldine & Nye, Martha L. Benner and Cullom Davis et al., eds., The Law Practice of Abraham Lincoln: Complete Documentary Edition, http://www.lawpracticeofabrahamlincoln.org/Details.aspx?case=135392.

Autograph Letter Signed, 3 page(s), Gilder Lehrman Collection (New York, New York)