Isaac Funk to Abraham Lincoln and Edward D. Baker, 1 March 1849
Hon Abram Lincolnand Hon E. D. BakerD Sir
myself together with all the whigs of Bloomington are exceedingly anxious to have an honest man for Postmaster at this place and I wish to ask of you as a special favor to myself and your friends here that you have appointed Hazo Parsons—he is competent—old— poor— and lame & has a large family and is unable to labor and it is the general wish of the whigs of this place that he should be appointed— We have been to long cursed with the post office here that we now feel anxious to have a good postmaster as it is all the whigs here expect to ask they think they have a right to this[.] any thing you can do in this behalf will be gratefully acknowledged by your
RespectfullyIsaac Funk1
1Parsons received the appointment and held the office until at least 1853.
Register of all Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1847 (Washington, DC: J. & G. S. Gideon, 1847), 406; Register of all Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1849 (Washington, DC: Gideon, 1849), 468; Edward Tremayne, Tremayne’s Table of the Post Offices in the United States (New York: W. F. Burgess, 1850), 38; Table of Post Offices in the United States on the First Day of January, 1851 (Washington, DC: W. & J. C. Greer, 1851), 24; Register of Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1853 (Washington, DC: Robert Armstrong), 497.

Autograph Letter Signed, 1 page(s), Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress (Washington, DC),