Gurdon S. Hubbard to Abraham Lincoln, 17 February 18491
Hon: Soloman Lincoln2Dr[Dear] Sir,
Our friend Jno: H Kinzie Esqr[Esquire] visits washington City with a view of soliciting, under Gen: Taylors administration, the appointment of Receiver for this Land district– there is no one in this community whose appointment would be more satisfactory to the whig party, or in whose capacity and integrity the Goverment could place more reliance– you are doubless[doubtless] aware that Mr Kinzie received the appointment to this office from our lamented Gen: Harrison & removed by Mr Tyler on political grounds–3 this fact I think should have its weight in reinstating him. Mr Kinzie has filled several offices with honor to the Goverment & credit to himself which is a guarantee for his future course in any appointment given him– he is an unfaultering whig in principal, & always gives his time and influance to the good cause– Any assistance you can render him in promoting the object of his visit will be remembered as a personal favour– permit me to say that your efforts in his behalf will meet with the warm approval of our party generally in this quarter–
I have the utmost confidence in him
Your friendG S. Hubbard4

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No 11.
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02/17/1849
Feb.[February] 17 1849 From G. S. Hubbard Esqr to Hon. S. Lincoln.
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Receiver Chicago Ill[Illinois] John H Kinzie
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placed on file with J. H. Kinzie’s papers at the request of Mr Lincoln.–
1Hubbard wrote the body of this letter in its entirety. Kinzie wrote some the docketing on page two.
2Hubbard obviously mis-identifies Lincoln as “Soloman.”
3In actuality, Harrison appointed Kinzie as register of the General Land Office in Chicago. And Tyler did not replace him immediately, as Kinzie still held the position in September 1841. The Official Register also has Kinzie in the job as of September 1843. It is not entirely clear when Tyler removed Kinzie, but it would be characteristic of Tyler’s behavior in the latter part of his administration, as he abandon his previous support for civil service reform and replaced Whigs with Democrats and other would be supporters to build support for a presidential run in 1844.
Register of all Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1841 (Washington, DC: Thomas Allen, 1841), 89; Register of all Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, from the Thirtieth September, 1841 to the Thirtieth September, 1843 (Washington, DC: J. & G. S. Gideon, 1843), 125; Norma Lois Peterson, The Presidencies of William Henry Harrison & John Tyler (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1989), 53, 146-47, 169, 175.
4Kinzie received the appointment as receiver, holding the job until 1853.
Register of all Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1849 (Washington, DC: Gideon, 1849), 137; Register of all Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1851 (Washington, DC: Gideon, 1851), 141; Register of Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1853 (Washington, DC: Robert Armstrong, 1853), 139.

Autograph Letter Signed, 2 page(s), Box 250, RG 48, Entry 15: Records of the Office of the Secretary of the Interior, 1833-1964, Divisional Records, 1843-1943, Records of the Appointments Division, 1817-1922, Field Office Appointment Papers, NACP