In force, Feb.[February] 10, 1841.
An ACT reorganizing the Judiciary of the State of Illinois.
1
Acts repealed
Sec.[Section] 1. Be it enacted by the People of the State of Illinois, represented in the General Assembly, That “An act establishing a circuit court north of the Illinois river,” approved, January eighth, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-nine; also “An act to establish a uniform mode of holding circuit courts,” approved, January seventh, one thousand eight hundred and thirty-five; also, “An act dividing the State into judicial circuits,” approved, January seventeenth, one thousand eight hundred and thirty-five; also, “An act forming an additional judicial circuit,” approved, February fourth, one thousand eight hundred and thirty-seven; also, “An act dividing the State into judicial circuits,” approved, February twenty-third, one thousand eight hundred and thirty-nine; and also, all other acts and parts of acts establishing circuit courts and authorizing the election of circuit judges in this State, be, and the same are hereby repealed.
Additional judges.
Sec. 2. There shall be appointed by joint ballot of both branches of the General Assembly at the present session thereof, five additional associate justices of the supreme court, who in connection with the chief justice and present associate justices, shall constitute the supreme court of the State of Illinois.
State divided into circuits.
Powers of judges.
Sec. 3. The State shall be divided into nine judicial circuits, and the aforesaid chief justice and eight associate justices shall perform circuit duties in said circuits, in such manner and at such times as shall be provided by law, and shall possess the same powers and jurisdiction, and be governed by the same rules, regulations and restrictions that are now applicable to the present circuit courts of this State.

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All cases continued over.
Powers of courts.
Sec. 4. This act shall be construed to continue over to the circuit courts created by this act, all cases, suits, writs, recognizances, process and proceedings of every description and kind, pending at the passage of this act, in the circuit courts hereby repealed, with full power and authority in the courts so created to proceed, to hear and determine, and have cognizance of all such causes, suits, writs, recognizances, process and proceedings in the same manner the said repealed circuit courts could have done had no change in said courts taken place; all writs, process and recognizances, which shall be issued or taken, returnable to or for appearance in the circuit courts of this State, before the statutes passed at the present session of the General Assembly shall be printed, shall be considered returnable to and for appearance in the courts created by this act.
WM. L. D. EWING,
Speaker of the House of Representatives.
S. H. ANDERSON,
Speaker of the Senate
.
[certification]
Certificate.
This bill having been returned by the Council of Revision with objections thereto, and after reconsideration, having passed both houses by the constitutional majority, it has become a law, this tenth day of February, one thousand eight hundred and forty-one.
WM. L. D. EWING,
Speaker of the House of Representatives.
S. H. ANDERSON,
Speaker of the Senate
.
1Adam W. Snyder introduced SB 34 to the Senate on December 10, 1840. The Senate passed the bill on January 9, 1841. The House of Representatives voted the bill to a second reading on January 20 by a vote of 49 yeas and 39 nays, and then voted against printing 100 copies by a vote of 40 yeas and 46 nays. The next day, the House proposed a resolution ordering that the legislature take up the bill every afternoon until passed. The House rejected a motion to lay the resolution on the table by a vote of 41 yeas and 41 nays, Abraham Lincoln voting yea. The House then voted to consider the resolution by a vote of 43 yeas and 40 nays, Lincoln voting nay. The House passed the resolution by a vote of 43 nays and 40 nays, Lincoln voting nay. The House considered the bill as the Committee of the Whole on January 22, 25, 27, and 29. The next day the House voted to take up the bill by a vote of 49 yeas and 40 nays, Lincoln voting nay, and then ordered it to a third reading by a vote of 46 yeas to 43 nays, Lincoln again voting nay. The House rejected a proposal to lay the bill on the table by a vote of 39 yeas and 49 nays, Lincoln voting yea, and then voted to take up the bill by a vote of 49 yeas and 39 nays, Lincoln voting nay. The House passed the bill by a vote of 45 yeas and 43 nays, Lincoln voting nay. The Council of Revision vetoed the bill and returned it to the Senate with its objections on February 8. Later that day, the Senate again passed the bill, despite the Council’s objections, by a vote of 23 yeas and 16 nays. On February 10, the House again passed the bill, thereby overriding the Council’s veto, by a vote of 46 yeas to 43 nays, Lincoln voting nay, and the act became law.
Illinois House Journal. 1840. 12th G. A., 211, 250-51, 261-62, 266, 279, 284-85, 289, 294, 297-98, 303-4, 310-11, 312, 358, 365-66; Illinois Senate Journal. 1840. 12th G. A., 65, 71, 85, 99, 138, 147-49, 227, 232, 257-72, 273-74, 288.

Printed Document, 2 page(s), Laws of the State of Illinois, Passed by the Twelfth General Assembly (Springfield, IL: William Walters, 1841), 173-74, GA Session 12-2,