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Josiah B. Herrick to Abraham Lincoln, 20 April 18491
Hon, A, LincolnDear Sir
I contemplate making application for the office of Receiver of Public monies at the Land Office in this place– If I come as well recommended—by the whigs of this Land District, and other portions of the State, as the applicants already before you—can I expect your influence in my behalf? I have mad[e] no effort as yet, and shall not until I get your reply– I am confident, even at this late date, that my recommendations will be as respectable as those who have been in advance of me, and my claims under present circumstances, I think better.
I believe that a large proportion of the power of directing the appointment lies with you– and I shall have all confidence in your advice upon the subject, so please be explicit with me–
Yours–
Most respectfully–
J. B. Herrick2
1Josiah B. Herrick wrote and signed this letter.
2Lincoln’s response, if he penned one, has not been located.
James T. B. Stapp and Frederick Remann were also vying for the office of receiver. Stapp would receive the appointment and hold the position until at least 1851.
Register of all Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1849 (Washington, DC: Gideon, 1849), 137; Register of all Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1851 (Washington, DC: Gideon, 1851), 141; Illinois Journal (Springfield), 11 July 1849, 1:6; Illinois Daily Journal (Springfield), 4 September 1850, 2:4.

Autograph Letter Signed, 1 page(s), Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress (Washington, DC), .