View up to date information on how Illinois is handling the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) from the Illinois Department of Public Health


John M. Bush to Abraham Lincoln, 28 April 18491
Hon A. LincolnDr Sir,
Enclosed You will please find the proceedings of a meeting this day holden in our Town in pursuance of Your advice in a letter to W. D. Briggs Esq[Esquire].2
You will perceive that the vote is quite a Large one for our Precinct, and I suppose will settle this question—at least, so far as the expression of opinion of the People is concerned,
We now look for Your action in the matter and hope the Department will also act in the matter soon
Respectfully Yours &c[etc]Jno. M. Bush3
<Page 2>
TREMONT Ill.[Illinois]
APR[April] 28
PAID
Paid
5
Hon A. LincolnSpringfield,Sangamon Co[County],Illinois.
1John M. Bush wrote and signed this letter, including the address on the second sheet, which was folded to create an envelope.
2The proceedings that Bush references were not included with this letter, and their whereabouts are unknown.
Dated April 21, 1849, Abraham Lincoln’s letter to William D. Briggs offered the latter advice on resolving the vexing question over who should receive the appointment as the new postmaster of Tremont. Alanson Stockwell and David Roberts were the original frontrunners for the job. Lincoln recommended one of the two to the Post Office Department, but then he began receiving letters opposing both Stockwell and Roberts and supporting John H. Ball as an alternative. Joseph L. Shaw also became a candidate. With Tremonters at odds over which candidate they preferred, Lincoln was forced to write the Post Office Department and ask that if the appointment was not already made, to suspend it until the town could unify around one candidate. Lincoln advised Briggs “to get up a full and fair meeting” of the Whigs and, if he thought fit, Democrats of the area to decide who would become postmaster.
3Lincoln preferred Roberts and recommended him for the position. Roberts received the appointment in May 1849 and held the job until 1860.
Fitz Henry Warren to Abraham Lincoln; Benjamin F. James to Abraham Lincoln; Register of all Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1849 (Washington, DC: Gideon, 1849), *489; Register of all Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1851 (Washington, DC: Gideon, 1851), 550*; Register of Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1853 (Washington, DC: Robert Armstrong, 1853), *520; Register of Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1855 (Washington, DC: A. O. P. Nicholson, 1855), 346*; Register of Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1857 (Washington, DC: A. O. P. Nicholson, 1857), 346*; Register of Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1859 (Washington, DC: William A. Harris, 1859), 74*; Register of Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1861 (Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 1862), 376*.

Autograph Letter Signed, 2 page(s), Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress (Washington, DC), .