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Joseph T. Eccles to Abraham Lincoln, 20 April 18491
Hon A. LincolnDear Sir,
Yours post marked 15th Came duly to hand–2 The object of your letter is rather delicate to me, as an expression of preferences between friends, is not very desirable– But as I suppose your object is solely to decide in the matter as the feeling of our friends may seem to indicate I shall give you a frank expression– Dr Stapp and Col. Reaman are both my very particular personal friends– Either of them is well qualified to discharge the duties of Receiver– Dr Stapp as a clerk has no superior in the western Country– If the whigs of the immediate vicinity of Vandalia had the matter to decide Col.[Colonel] Reaman would receive the appointment– I think in a contest between the two in Fayette 3/4 of the whigs would be found
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for Reaman– Dr Stapp on one or two occasions, in our county elections, when the whigs took great interest ^and had some prospect of success^ joined the Locoes and was very active in defeating our ticket– I mention these things for your information– The circumstance of the Dr. having been long in office should have some influence– I am not favorable to continuing a man always in office–
Your friendJ. T. Eccles3
1Joseph T. Eccles wrote and signed this letter.
2Abraham Lincoln’s letter has not been located.
3James T. B. Stapp and Frederick Remann were vying to become receiver of the U.S. General Land Office at Vandalia. Stapp would receive the appointment and hold the position until at least 1851.
Register of all Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1849 (Washington, DC: Gideon, 1849), 137; Register of all Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1851 (Washington, DC: Gideon, 1851), 141; Illinois Journal (Springfield), 11 July 1849, 1:6; Illinois Daily Journal (Springfield), 4 September 1850, 2:4.

Autograph Letter Signed, 2 page(s), Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress (Washington, DC), .