David M. Woodson to Abraham Lincoln, 16 February 18491
Hon A LincolnDear Sir,
I addressed you a letter a few days since on behalf of our old friend McCallen who wants to be marshal for California;2 and hearing that our mutual friend James M Davis Esq.[Esquire] intends applying for the office of Register at Vandalia, I have taken the liberty, (which I hope you will excuse) of again writing to you to use your influence in behalf of Davis, if you are not otherwise committed Davis is needy and for his efforts [with?] fearful odds, against him, for the party in his part of the state, deserves something at the hands of his friends when they have any thing to bestow. I do not know who will compete for the office; but presuming that a new register will be appointed; I could feel no hesitation in ^lending my^ aiding as far as I could in procuring the office for a friend, such as Davis; I knew of no other way to serve him better than to write to
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Baker and yourself: (understanding that Baker had gone on to Washington), as I know no other person there, and believing also that your influence is all that would be necessary to obtain him the office.
Your influence in behalf of Davis I am sure would be appreciated by Davis and his friends, and would be gratifying to the entire Whig party; and I am sure his appointment would be genuinely acceptable.
Your friend trulyD. M. Woodson3
[docketing]
No 6
Letter of D M Woodward ^Woodson^ for J M Davis, as Register of Land office at Vandalia Illinois.
1Woodson wrote the body of this letter in its entirety.
2McCallen did not become marshal of California; instead, he received appointment as register of the General Land Office at Shawneetown. He held this post from August 1849 to May 1853.
Register of all Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1849 (Washington, DC: Gideon, 1849), 135; Register of all Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1851 (Washington, DC: Gideon, 1851), 139; Register of Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1853 (Washington, DC: Robert Armstrong, 1853), 138; Arthur Charles Cole, ed., The Constitutional Debates of 1847 (Springfield: Illinois State Historical Library, 1919), 969.
3Davis himself wrote Lincoln several letters in the spring and summer of 1849 regarding his application, urging Lincoln to respond whether he had received the application materials and whether they had been forwarded to the proper department. In a letter from Davis dated April 9, 1849, Lincoln endorsed it by writing “Ansd before written.” Lincoln’s answer, however, has not been found.
Davis received the appointment, serving as register from July 1849 until 1853.
James M. Davis to Abraham Lincoln; James M. Davis to Abraham Lincoln; James M. Davis to Abraham Lincoln; James M. Davis to Abraham Lincoln; Register of all Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1849 (Washington, DC: Gideon, 1849), 135; Register of all Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1851 (Washington, DC: Gideon, 1851), 140; Register of Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1853 (Washington, DC: Robert Armstrong, 1853), 138; Illinois Journal (Springfield), 18 July 1849, 4:3.

Autograph Letter Signed, 2 page(s), Box 252, RG 48, Entry 15: Records of the Office of the Secretary of the Interior, 1833-1964, Divisional Records, 1843-1943, Records of the Appointments Division, 1817-1922, Field Office Appointment Papers, NACP