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Philo H. Thompson to Abraham Lincoln, 23 April 18491
Hon A LincolnDr Sir
Your kind letter came to hand a few moments since.2 A paper addressed to Mr Collamer is now in circulation in relation to our Post office which will be signed by our active Whigs and some leading democrats, it will be sent to Dr Henry tomorrow as requested by him and will of course be examined by yourself. Gridley I have no hesitation in saying could obtain the signatures of three quarters if not seven eights of the voters in this town for the appointment– As it is you will observe that nearly all the business men have signed it. Casey & Gill are both absent or they would sign. So far as my personal feelings are concerned in this matter, had Bailey resided in town and attended to the office himself I would not have said a word, for we are on the most friendly relations, but it is the manner in which the business has been done, evidently and beyond doubt in my mind the object is to keep Tackaberry in, as he and Bailey are related and Bailey does not and cannot intend to attend to the duties of the office.3 Again the people here were not consulted at all in the matter, and after a good deal of enquiry
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I cannot find the first man who knew that Bailey was an applicant for the office, or thought of asking for it. I do not myself feel so warmly upon the subject as others but the whole town feel so far as my observation extends that they have been imposed upon–4 T. R. King has been charged before this with being an abolitionist. The charge is a false one, ever since he has been here he has been a warm active whig. What he may have been before his removal to Tazewell I know not. He had a brother here awhile in business with him who was an avowed and open abolitionist, but ^T. R^ King always opposed him while here in conversation and by his votes. That King occasionally takes a glass of something stronger then water I have no doubt but that he is a drunkard is also false. That King plays occassionally a game of Eucre[,] whist[,] & Poker I have no doubt. never playing any of those games myself I have never been in the way of knowing to what extent he plays. our friend Dr Henry knows all about King more than I do, I presume, for I have not been on very intimate terms with King at any time, although we are on very friendly terms,5 one thing more, my old friends in Tremont seem to be in trouble in relation to their Post office.
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The truth is (between us) that neither of the applicants are just the thing, and I wonder that some better man was not brought out by them. As it is, I suppose you have decided between them. Dr Stockwell's location is in his favor, but he is the last man who really ought to have an office under Gen. Taylor. He is an abolitionist and I am informed voted for Van Buren.6 He never did a thing for the Whigs and never will. I care nothing about this matter and the Tremonters will keep you advised all about it.7 You must find it irksome and troublesome attending to the numerous calls for office in our state. I trust however you will be rewarded for your attentions to your numerous friends by increased attestment on their part and by getting a good fat office from Gen Taylor
Very truly
Your Sincere friend
P. H. Thompson
1Philo H. Thompson wrote and signed this letter.
2Thompson wrote Abraham Lincoln on April 19; Lincoln apparently responded, but his letter has not been located.
3Daniel M. Bailey received appointment as postmaster of Pekin on February 17, 1849, replacing Middleton Tackaberry.
Record of Appointment of Postmasters, 1832-1971, NARA Microfilm Publication, M841, 145 rolls, Records of the Post Office Department, RG 28, 1845-1855, 18:186, National Archives Building, Washington, DC.
4On May 15, 1849, Jacob Gridley replaced Bailey as postmaster of Pekin and held the position until April 1853.
Fitz Henry Warren to Abraham Lincoln; Record of Appointment of Postmasters, 1832-1971, NARA Microfilm Publication, M841, 145 rolls, Records of the Post Office Department, RG 28, 1845-1855, 18:186, National Archives Building, Washington, DC; Register of all Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1849 (Washington, DC: Gideon, 1849), *485; Register of all Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1851 (Washington, DC: Gideon, 1851), 544*; Register of Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1853 (Washington, DC: Robert Armstrong, 1853), 514*.
5In December 1848, Thompson wrote Lincoln urging him to get Turner R. King a job with the U.S. General Land Office in Springfield, Illinois. From December 1848 to February 1849, Lincoln received several letters urging him to help King secure a position with the General Land Office. On April 7, 1849, Lincoln wrote a letter to Secretary of the Interior Thomas Ewing recommending King for the job of register. On April 13, he wrote another letter reversing himself, recommending King for the job of receiver. On April 25, Lincoln wrote Thompson that a “tirade” has erupted over his support for King, bemoaning that his influence in Washington had broken down and that King’s prospects for a job diminished. Nonetheless, Lincoln penned another letter on May 10 recommending King for the job of register. In late May, King received the appointment as register and held the job until 1853.
Niles’ National Register (Philadelphia, PA), 23 May 1849, 1:2; Register of all Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1849 (Washington, DC: Gideon, 1849), 135; Register of all Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1851 (Washington, DC: Gideon, 1851), 140; Register of Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1853 (Washington, DC: Robert Armstrong, 1853), 138; Samuel R. Baker to Abraham Lincoln; William B. Doolittle to Abraham Lincoln; Robert W. Briggs to Abraham Lincoln; Richard T. Gill to Abraham Lincoln.
6Reference to Alanson Stockwell’s supposed support of Martin Van Buren in the presidential election of 1848.
7Stockwell and David Roberts were the leading candidates for postmaster of Tremont. Lincoln also received numerous letters recommending John H. Ball as an alternative. Lincoln preferred Roberts and recommended him for the position. Roberts received the appointment in May 1849 and held the job until 1860.
Petition of Richard T. Gill and Others to Abraham Lincoln; Richard T. Gill and Littleton T. Garth to Abraham Lincoln; Mary L. Perkins to Abraham Lincoln; Fitz Henry Warren to Abraham Lincoln; Benjamin F. James to Abraham Lincoln; Register of all Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1849 (Washington, DC: Gideon, 1849), *489; Register of all Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1851 (Washington, DC: Gideon, 1851), 550*; Register of Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1853 (Washington, DC: Robert Armstrong, 1853), *520; Register of Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1855 (Washington, DC: A. O. P. Nicholson, 1855), 346*; Register of Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1857 (Washington, DC: A. O. P. Nicholson, 1857), 346*; Register of Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1859 (Washington, DC: William A. Harris, 1859), 74*; Register of Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1861 (Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 1862), 376*.

Autograph Letter Signed, 3 page(s), Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress (Washington, DC), .