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Jesse K. Dubois to Abraham Lincoln, 24 June 18491
Hon A Lincoln
It is in the hope that you are now in Washington that I now write to you, and t it is my hearts desire that you are now commissioner of G. L. C.2
I now write you again for Ryan, to be Register at Palestine,3 I take the Responsibility of saying to you that all of your friends here do wish that event to take place, and as far as I am concerned I do say that I have no desire that McLean should be appointed If he is appointed, why I shall have to submit but I would personally rather see Doct Alexander retained than have McLean appointed.4 When the proper time arrives I shall go to see you in person or write you in full my views about myself which I do not at present feel at liberty of doing. You have no friend on the Wabash who you can make as large drafts upon as myself and who will never deceve you and I am not certain but what you mistrust me occasionally5
yoursJ. K. DuboisLet this be private and confidential)

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07/20/1849
20th July/49[1849]
E Z Ryan for Register at Palestine Ills[Illinois]
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Letter from J. K. Duboys Stating that he would prefer the retention of the incumbent than the appt[appointment] of Mr McLean
1Jesse K. Dubois wrote and signed this letter.
2Dubois references the contest to see who would replace Richard M. Young as commissioner of the U.S. General Land Office. Justin H. Butterfield, James L. D. Morrison, and Cyrus Edwards were among the early contestants. Abraham Lincoln entered the competition after learning that Butterfield was favored over Morrison and Edwards.
As competition for the job intensified, William H. Henderson and Josiah Lucas, Lincoln supporters living in Washington, urged Lincoln to travel to the nation’s capital to personally lobby for the position. On June 9, Butterfield wrote Lincoln suggesting that neither go to Washington. Lincoln did not respond to this suggestion, and on June 10, both set out for the capital. Lincoln arrived on or before June 19.
On June 11, Dubois wrote Lincoln that he had sent a personal letter on his behalf to President Zachary Taylor, and assured Lincoln that he was working to get both Whigs and Democrats in Lawrence County behind Lincoln. Ultimately, neither Morrison, Edwards, nor Lincoln received the appointment; the job went to Butterfield instead. See the General Land Office Affair.
3Dubois first wrote Lincoln endorsing Ebenezer Z. Ryan for the job in April 1849.
4Ryan himself wrote Lincoln on June 24, asking for Lincoln’s help in his application. James M. McLean would receive the appointment and hold the position until 1853.
Register of all Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1849 (Washington, DC: Gideon, 1849), 135; Register of all Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1851 (Washington, DC: Gideon, 1851), 140; Register of Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1853 (Washington, DC: Robert Armstrong, 1853), 138.
5Dubois had apparently lobbied Lincoln to recommend him for the position of receiver at the U.S. General Land Office at Palestine. President Taylor appointed Dubois as receiver, a position he held until 1853.
Register of all Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1849, 137; Register of all Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1851, 141; Register of Officers and Agents, Civil, Military, and Naval, in the Service of the United States, on the Thirtieth September, 1853, 139.

Autograph Letter Signed, 2 page(s), Box 252, RG 48, Entry 15: Records of the Office of the Secretary of the Interior, 1833-1964, Divisional Records, 1843-1943, Records of the Appointments Division, 1817-1922, Field Office Appointment Papers, NACP.