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Abraham R. McIlvaine to Abraham Lincoln, 18 June 18491
Dear Lincoln
Your note of the 4th, did not reach me until Friday evening, and I embrace the first mail (south) to comply with your request–2 I hope it is not yet too late, if it be of any value–3 Certainly there is no one in Ill. or any other state, upon whom I would rather see this appointment fall than upon yourself– You know we all wished you to have it in the first place– and I have thought that there would be no impropriety in leting Genl Taylor know it–4 I hope sincerely that you may succeed– And to shew you that I am acting disinterested in the matter I bespeak from you, in advance, a place for a brother of mine who has recently been unexpectedly thrown out of business Provided that you have not already made your appointments5
vry[very] truly
Your Frd[Friend]
A R McIlvaine
1Abraham R. McIlvaine wrote and signed this letter.
2Abraham Lincoln’s letter to McIlvaine has not been located. In early June 1849, Lincoln sent a series of letters to numerous people requesting letters in support of his candidacy for commissioner of the U.S. General Land Office. Presumably, he made a similar request of McIlvaine.
3McIlvaine’s letter of recommendation on behalf of Lincoln has not been located.
4Thomas Ewing was secretary of the U.S. Department of the Interior, the department which oversaw the U.S. General Land Office. President Zachary Taylor, however, was ultimately responsible for appointing the commissioner of the U.S. General Land Office.
5Ultimately, neither Morrison, Edwards, nor Lincoln received the appointment; the job went to Butterfield instead. See the General Land Office Affair.

Autograph Letter Signed, 1 page(s), Abraham Lincoln Papers, Library of Congress (Washington, DC).